Tag Archives: Reddit

Adrien Chen On Theorizing The Web

Betabeat has a write up of the awesome conference that went down last weekend on internet issues and social media, Theorizing The Web. Gawker writer Adrien Chen has some reflections too.

If you read Nathan Jurgenson’s pieces on Snapchat or Instagram, you see someone who really values and understands the technology but is also highly skeptical and curious about how it really works. It all goes back to the question of control: Are we letting these technologies control us while Silicon Valley billionaires get rich? Or can we maintain our critical facilities and agency, while still taking advantage of social media? Theory can help us address the very real issues about social media without falling into the technophobic “is facebook making us lonely” panic that characterizes so much mainstream discourse around social media and the internet.

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With Fake Viral Videos, Tradional Media Are Duped

First there was the bird of prey nearly snatching up a baby in his talons.

Now an adorable, heroic pig saves a drowning baby goat.

As it turns out, both of these videos were manufactured stunts. Writing at paidContent,the media observer Mathew Ingram praises these vids for their entertainment value, but criticizes the journalistic outlets who broadcast them without verifying if they are, in fact, authentic.

Where BuzzFeed and Reddit specialize in this kind of sharable, internet gold, traditional media merely amplify the marketing efforts of these viral campaigns, Ingram argues. He also notes that this both erodes the trust we have with journalists, and by imitating linky internet sites, renders their journalism more irrelevant.

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Making Comments Smarter: The Verge And The Huffington Post

PandoDaily

PandoDaily

Internet forums and comment sections are the netherworld of the Web. Thankfully, many media companies are revamping the way they do comments. Writing at PandoDaily, Hamish McKenzie outlines the shortcomings of online discussion and presents the commenting innovations of The Verge, The Huffington Post and others.

Two advancements that McKenzie explains are notable.

1) Curated forums that serve as miniature communities for readers and the author. This is currently being implemented at all of Gawker’s sites (Gawker, Jezebel, Gizmodo) as well as ReadWrite and The Verge.

2) Up-voting and internal organization of comments. Similar to Reddit and Quora, The Huffington Post is deploying a platform enabling favorable comments to rise to the top, achieving prominence. This helps readers sort through the hundreds of crap comments and draws their attention to what the crowd or the gods have deemed important.

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