Why Are Congressional Websites So Bad?

Joe Brockmeier at ReadWriteWeb points out the glaring faults of the digital political world:

What you won’t find is any information about many things you might actually want to know, such as the aforementioned voting records. Also uniformly absent is a list of committees that the congressperson serves on, how bills actually become law, the lobbyists that they’ve met with, campaign donors, or anything that poses a danger of arming citizens with any real information that might lead to more intelligent voting. It’s as if our elected officials don’t want us to know what they’re doing in office. 

An easy way to become nauseated is to take a quick glance at Senate.gov and read the HOW TO guide on congressional votes

Looking at votes through THOMAS is easy if you know the date the vote occurred or you know the vote or bill number, but there is no subject access to votes and the description of each vote is very brief. House vote charts are broken out by yeas, nays, and not voting, and include overall vote tallies and party breakdowns. The Senate vote charts are grouped by three categories: yeas, nays, and not voting; alphabetically by name; and by state. The Senate charts also provide overall tallies, but not party breakdowns.  

Basically, there exists no readily available list of votes sorted by THE ACTUAL REPRESENTATIVES. To have these stats listed prominently on the websites of individual Representatives and Senators would be asking too much.

Advertisements
Tagged , ,

Your Thoughts?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: